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Itasca Qualifies Six Wrestlers for NJCAA Nationals

February 11, 2019 | From The Guillotine

The Itasca wrestling team placed second in the Northern Regional District qualifying six wrestlers to compete at the NJCAA National Tournament. Returning All-American and last year’s regional champion Corey Schmidt claimed another regional title wining at 197 pounds against Rochester’s Morgan Moreno 8-4. Tanner Reetz also claimed his second regional championship uncontested this year at 133 pounds. Claiming second place finishes for the Vikings included 149 pounder Ethan Kiehm, 174-pounder Dalton Bernett, and heavyweight Devin Reynolds. Kiehm dominated in his true-second match against Rashawn Crumpler with a fall in the first period. Bernett also claimed victory in his true-second match with a technical fall in the first period over Northland Community & Technical College’s Thomas Scheett. Reynolds lost his finals match to NCTC’s Andre Baguma by fall near the end of the third period. Cody Sawyer secured a position at the national tournament finishing third by losing to rival Adam Rients of Minneosta West Community & Technical College by fall in the first period for the true-second match. This was the fourth time these two have faced off and are now split 2-2 with each other.

Everyone that competed for the Vikings this past weekend punched their ticket to compete at NJCAA Nationals to be held in Council Bluffs, Iowa on March 1st and 2nd.

2019 NJCAA North Central District Results

Itasca Placers/Qualifiers

133 – Tanner Reetz 1st

149 – Ethan Kiehm 2nd

157 – Cody Sawyer 3rd

174 – Dalton Bernett 2nd

197 – Corey Schmidt 1st

Hwt – Devin Reynolds 2nd

Award-winning author to host movie release at ICC

Kent Nerburn, author of the award-winning novel, Neither Wolf Nor Dog, is coming to Grand Rapids to lead discussions during four screenings of the movie inspired by his book.

Indian Country Today says about the movie, “Neither Wolf Nor Dog” is the story of a well-meaning white writer (Nerburn himself, played by Christopher Sweeney) who is drawn into Native culture when a Lakota elder asks him to turn a box full of notes into a book. The elder — a man named Dan is played by 95-year-old David Bald Eagle — uses the opportunity to poke holes in Nerburn’s — and the audience’s — assumptions about Native people. David Bald Eagle walked on his journey to the spirit world… at age 97, but was able to view the film and said, “It’s the only film I’ve been in about my people that told the truth.”

All screenings of “Neither Wolf Nor Dog” will be in Chucker Auditorium in Davies Hall on the Itasca Community College campus. Admission is free with donations appreciated to go toward building a playground in Ball Club, envisioned by youth in the community. Screenings will include an opening blessing ceremony, the full feature film, and a discussion with local Indigenous leaders hosted by Nerburn. Copies of Nerburn’s books will be available for purchase including the follow-up book to “Neither Wolf Nor Dog,” “The Wolf at Twilight,” which won the Minnesota Book Award in 2010, and “The Girl Who Sang to the Buffalo,” which completed the trilogy in 2013.

On Tuesday, Feb. 19, 6 p.m. at the Grand Rapids Area Public Library, Nerburn will give a talk, “Hidden Joys of a Life in the Arts,” which focuses on his most recent book, “Dancing With the Gods: Reflections on Life and Art,” and how “Neither Wolf Nor Dog,” was adapted for the big screen.

All events made possible by a partnership between the Circle of Healing, Itasca Community College and the Minnesota Department of Corrections with support from the Blandin Foundation.

“Neither Wolf Nor Dog,” is an epic road trip that weaves documentary into a dramatically told story. Set in the vast high plains of the western Dakotas, it tells the story of traveling the back roads through contemporary reservations and sites with historical significance, as the elder, Dan, relates the stories and philosophies that he wants Nerburn to write in a book for him.

In both the book and the film, Nerburn’s philosophy rings true. He says he is always aware of being, “the white man in the room,” and is aware that he does not have the answers to past tragedies. He does want his work to help build a bridge between the two cultures, “a bridge to the common humanity that lies beneath our many differences.”

The American Indian College Fund agrees that he has with “Neither Wolf Nor Dog,” issuing the following statement: “This is one of those rare works that once you’ve read it, you can never look at the world, or at people the same way again. It is quiet and forceful and powerful.”

Nerburn has published 16 books of creative non-fiction that have focused on Native American and American culture as well as general spirituality. It was an earlier work, “To Walk the Red Road: Memories of the Red Lake Ojibwe,” that fascinated Dan and inspired the journey recounted in “Neither Wolf Nor Dog.” “To Walk the Red Road,” a collection of photographs and memories of the Red Lake Ojibwe people was produced by Red Lake High School students with Nerburn’s editorial direction.

The highly acclaimed film was produced and directed by Scottish filmmaker Steven Lewis Simpson who also shares a screenwriting credit. The cast is likewise international. Chief Dave Bald Eagle, at age 95, plays Dan. Chief Dave Bald Eagle was Lakota with many movie credits as both an actor and a stuntman, including Dances with Wolves. The final impassioned speech given by Dan in the film was ad-libbed by Chief Dave telling his own, parallel, story. Christopher Sweeney of Yakima, Wash., plays Nerburn. Richard Ray Whitman of the Muscogee Creek Nation plays Grover. Also starring is Tatanka Means, a professional actor and comedian of Lakota, Omaha, and Dine (Navajo) descent. Roseanne Supernault, a Canadian actress of Metis and Cree descent, plays twin sisters, Danielle and Wenonah. She starred as the title character in Maina, an acclaimed CBC production. Additionally, many recognizable Native American actors are also in the cast.


By Paula Rock For Circle of Healing

Press release from Grand Rapids Herald Review

Listen: Education Career Pathways

Career Pathways: ICC's Bart Johnson and Deer River High School Students
KAXE/KBXE Radio Morning Show

Listen on KAXE

Provost Bart Johnson appeared on the KAXE Morning Show to introduce Jenny Tyler and Neesha Moore, students at Deer River High School who particapated in Education Career Pathways. They spent last fall learning what a career in teaching was like, including spending time student teaching.

ICC Brings Green Card Voices to Campus

December 3, 2018

Itasca Community College and the Grand Rapids Human Rights Commission paired-up to bring the Green Card Voices of Central Minnesota to Itasca Community College on Monday, December 3rd. Green Card Voices shares personal narratives of immigrants, fostering increased understanding of the human side of the immigration controversy. Additional sponsorship by FREC, the Bush Foundation, the Blandin Foundation, and LeadMN. Pictured in the photo above is ICC student Desmond Ruffin with Green Card Voices presenters Suud Olat and Monica Segura.

The Green Cards Voices exhibit will be on display at ICC until December 12th and then at the Grand Rapids Area Library until January 8th.

The Green Card Voices exhibit features 18 first generation immigrant and refugee stories from 12 different countries of origin. The stories that make up this exhibit are Central Minnesota stories, told by community members who live here, work here, and serve here. The exhibit features individual 8ft. tall full-color banners displaying highlights of each incredible and unique story. Each banner includes a portraits, their 200-word bio, a quote and a QR code (viewers can scan them with smart phone/ipad and watch the first-person video story).

MORE ABOUT GREEN CARD VOICES

In 2013, Green Card Voices produced their first touring photo exhibit “Immigrants Telling Their Life Stories” as part of its mission to share immigrant stories with as many people possible. The exhibit featuring 20 Twin Cities’ immigrants has traveled to over 35 locations throughout Minnesota and has since evolved to meet high demand. In the past few years, Green Card Voices produced four additional exhibits in collaboration with their local partners in Central Minnesota, Willmar and Fargo, ND, and are now working on an exhibit in Atlanta, GA. For more about these additional exhibits, please visit the Green Card Voices website.

Itasca Hosts State Trap Championships

The Minnesota College Athletic Conference and the USA Clay Target League, recently concluded the inaugural season of the popular trap shooting sport with the MCAC Fall Championships, held on Tuesday, October 16 at the Grand Rapids Gun Club.

Full Article and Photos on the MCAC Website

While providing a platform for teams to compete in-person at the same site was the primary focus, the event was also a celebration of the popularity and rapid growth of the sport in and around Minnesota.

The one-day Championship event hosted by the Grand Rapids Gun Club might of taken place on a chilly and windy day, but participants, coaches, fans and families turned out in layers and smiles as they cheered on their teams.

While there were several great moments of competition, including two tie-breaking "first-miss" shoot-offs between the top two women's competitors and a third-place tie in the men's division, several of the best moments went beyond the scoresheets.

The community of Grand Rapids and the campus of Itasca Community College provided a great platform for all participating teams, with several squads traveling in the night prior to the event to prepare for a full day of competition.

Visit Grand Rapids, assisted out-of-town teams and fans find the best rates for lodging, and the Grand Rapids Gun Club turned out an army of volunteers to provide everything needed for a first-class event.

The overall team championship on the day was claimed by Vermilion Community College, who edged out Southwest Wisconsin Technical College by only two points.

For complete MCAC Fall Championships scoring, including team standings, individual championship leaderboard and top men's and women's individual finish, go to: http://mcac.claytargetscoring.com/ and select, CHAMPIONSHIP.




Public Comments Sought for HLC Accreditation

Itasca Community College is seeking comments from the public about the college in preparation for its standard, periodic evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The college will host a visit on February 25-27, 2019, from a team of peer reviewers representing the Higher Learning Commission. The team will review the institutions ongoing ability to meet HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation. HLC has been the accreditation body for Itasca Community College since 1982.

Comments must be in writing and must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs.

Submit comments to HLC at hlcommission.org/comment or mail them to the address below. All comments must be received by January 28, 2019.

Public Comment on Itasca Community College
Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604-1411

Itasca Instructor is Extreme Huntress

The following is attributed to the June 29, 2018 Star Tribune article by columnist Dennis Anderson. The full article can be read on the Star Tribune website.

If you’re in northern Minnesota in the coming weeks and see a woman jogging while wearing a down jacket, lugging a 20-pound pack and a carrying a 12-gauge shotgun, wish Meadow Kouffeld good luck.

Kouffeld, 34, is training to compete for the title of “Extreme Huntress” against two women from Europe and one from Washington state. The down jacket Kouffeld wears while exercising is intended to replicate the heat she and the other women will encounter during the weeklong contest near San Antonio, Texas, beginning July 29.

Other than “a lot of running and gunning,” Kouffeld is unsure exactly what to expect, though in past years a biathlon was included among skills tests.

“At times in the biathlon, an AK-47 has been used, or a similar rifle, and at other times it’s been a hunting rifle or a standard biathlon .22,” she said. “So we’ll see.”

Now in its 10th year, the worldwide Extreme Huntress competition is intended to “create positive role models for women who want to participate in hunting and the outdoor lifestyle,” according to organizers. Kouffeld and the other three finalists will be tested for fitness, as well as shooting, tracking and hunting skills.

“I don’t really like the words ‘extreme’ or ‘huntress,’ but I am serious about this competition,” Kouffeld said.

Meadow with rifle

Meadow Kouffeld’s aim is to inspire other women. (Image provided)

A native Californian, Kouffeld came to Minnesota in 2008 to attend graduate school at the University of Minnesota. Ruffed grouse were the subject of her master’s thesis, and after she finished her degree, she worked for the Minnesota and Wisconsin departments of natural resources before joining the Ruffed Grouse Society, stationed in Grand Rapids.

“I grew up in Northern California raising and showing chickens,” she said. “My dad was a hunter, and when I was a kid, he and I and my sister hunted a lot of quail and turkeys, as well as deer and other big game. We also hunted blue grouse, and I even shot a red-phase ruffed grouse once in California. I guess I’ve always been attracted to birds. So when I had a chance to come to Minnesota and study ruffed grouse, I took it.”

Kouffeld left the grouse group in January, in part to spend more time with her 5-year-old daughter. Now she teaches forest ecology, wildlife ecology and management, and dendrology (the study of trees) at Itasca Community College. She also coordinates that school’s annual Wildfire Academy, which draws about 700 firefighters from throughout Minnesota and beyond.

“I’ve been aware of the ‘Extreme Huntress’ competition since it started, and I entered it once previously,” Kouffeld said. “My sister in California also has entered. Neither of us made the finals on those attempts. But now that I have, I’m working hard to prepare. Promoting women in the outdoors is important to me, and this competition provides a platform to showcase our abilities.”

Among the contest’s first requirements, Kouffeld and the other women must attach and successfully align scopes to the rifles they’ll use daily during the competition. Then, during morning and evening outings on a 10,000-acre Texas ranch, they’ll hunt specific exotic big game animals, accompanied into the field by a hunting partner, a judge and a videographer. (The competition will be filmed for later airing.)

Between hunts, various skills tests will pit the women against one another.

“There will be shotgun challenges and rifle challenges, as well as pistol shooting and possibly archery,” Kouffeld said. “You don’t know what the requirements will be ahead of time. I shoot lefthanded, so AKs and rifles, if they’re made for righthanded shooters, can be a bit of a challenge for me. For that reason, I’m hoping for more shotgun competitions.”

The women likely also will be required to speak extemporaneously about wildlife conservation. Defending hunting’s role in wildlife management might also be required, possibly while being heckled by actors or others portraying themselves as anti-hunters.

Kouffeld is highly regarded in Minnesota wildlife management circles as a conservationist and hunter, and people who know her believe she can handle any situation she encounters.

Yet the heat worries her. She ran track in high school. But her knees aren’t 100 percent.

“In some past ‘Extreme Huntress’ contests, the four finalist women were asked to run multiple miles, and in other years, just one mile,” she said. “So we’ll see.”

Kouffeld was hunting in South Africa with her sister, Maggi, a captain with CAL FIRE, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, when she found out she had been named an “Extreme Huntress” semifinalist. Initial scoring was done online by viewers who watched videos of the women explain why they hunted, and why the competition appealed to them. Entrants also submitted essays to a panel of judges explaining the importance of hunting and an outdoors lifestyle.

A dog owner (Deutsch Drahthaars and English setters) who regularly pursues grouse and woodcock in Minnesota’s North Woods in the fall, Kouffeld also embraces adventure far from home. Two years ago, she accompanied her sister to Kyrgyzstan, along China’s western border, to hunt ibex.

“It was incredible,” she said. “At times we were only 100 yards from China. The people were great to us, and in that respect, it was the exact opposite of what I anticipated. But conditions were tough, especially when we were camped between 10,000 feet and 15,000 feet, with a stiff wind and a temperature of 22 below zero.”

Kouffeld doesn’t worry about being cold while exercising daily in and near Grand Rapids wearing a down jacket and toting a pack and shotgun. Fitness is her only concern. And at 5 feet 6 inches tall and 149 pounds, she said she’s about in the condition she wants to be.

Yet unlike the two European women finalists — one from Sweden, the other from Slovakia — Kouffeld has had only minimal corporate support. Vortex Optics has helped. The Grand Rapids shooting community is planning a fun shoot in July to kick in some money. But otherwise she’s depended on a gofundme.com effort to help cover her expenses. (To contribute, go to bit.ly/kouff.)

Winner of the competition will be announced at a Dallas Safari Club black tie dinner in January. A trophy is awarded. And the title of “Extreme Huntress.” But no money.

A native Californian, Kouffeld came to Minnesota in 2008 to attend graduate school at the University of Minnesota. Ruffed grouse were the subject of her master’s thesis, and after she finished her degree, she worked for the Minnesota and Wisconsin departments of natural resources before joining the Ruffed Grouse Society, stationed in Grand Rapids.

“I grew up in Northern California raising and showing chickens,” she said. “My dad was a hunter, and when I was a kid, he and I and my sister hunted a lot of quail and turkeys, as well as deer and other big game. We also hunted blue grouse, and I even shot a red-phase ruffed grouse once in California. I guess I’ve always been attracted to birds. So when I had a chance to come to Minnesota and study ruffed grouse, I took it.”

Kouffeld left the grouse group in January, in part to spend more time with her 5-year-old daughter. Now she teaches forest ecology, wildlife ecology and management, and dendrology (the study of trees) at Itasca Community College. She also coordinates that school’s annual Wildfire Academy, which draws about 700 firefighters from throughout Minnesota and beyond.

“I’ve been aware of the ‘Extreme Huntress’ competition since it started, and I entered it once previously,” Kouffeld said. “My sister in California also has entered. Neither of us made the finals on those attempts. But now that I have, I’m working hard to prepare. Promoting women in the outdoors is important to me, and this competition provides a platform to showcase our abilities.”

Among the contest’s first requirements, Kouffeld and the other women must attach and successfully align scopes to the rifles they’ll use daily during the competition. Then, during morning and evening outings on a 10,000-acre Texas ranch, they’ll hunt specific exotic big game animals, accompanied into the field by a hunting partner, a judge and a videographer. (The competition will be filmed for later airing.)

Between hunts, various skills tests will pit the women against one another.

“There will be shotgun challenges and rifle challenges, as well as pistol shooting and possibly archery,” Kouffeld said. “You don’t know what the requirements will be ahead of time. I shoot lefthanded, so AKs and rifles, if they’re made for righthanded shooters, can be a bit of a challenge for me. For that reason, I’m hoping for more shotgun competitions.”

The women likely also will be required to speak extemporaneously about wildlife conservation. Defending hunting’s role in wildlife management might also be required, possibly while being heckled by actors or others portraying themselves as anti-hunters.

Kouffeld is highly regarded in Minnesota wildlife management circles as a conservationist and hunter, and people who know her believe she can handle any situation she encounters.

Yet the heat worries her. She ran track in high school. But her knees aren’t 100 percent.

“In some past ‘Extreme Huntress’ contests, the four finalist women were asked to run multiple miles, and in other years, just one mile,” she said. “So we’ll see.”

Kouffeld was hunting in South Africa with her sister, Maggi, a captain with CAL FIRE, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, when she found out she had been named an “Extreme Huntress” semifinalist. Initial scoring was done online by viewers who watched videos of the women explain why they hunted, and why the competition appealed to them. Entrants also submitted essays to a panel of judges explaining the importance of hunting and an outdoors lifestyle.

A dog owner (Deutsch Drahthaars and English setters) who regularly pursues grouse and woodcock in Minnesota’s North Woods in the fall, Kouffeld also embraces adventure far from home. Two years ago, she accompanied her sister to Kyrgyzstan, along China’s western border, to hunt ibex.

“It was incredible,” she said. “At times we were only 100 yards from China. The people were great to us, and in that respect, it was the exact opposite of what I anticipated. But conditions were tough, especially when we were camped between 10,000 feet and 15,000 feet, with a stiff wind and a temperature of 22 below zero.”

Kouffeld doesn’t worry about being cold while exercising daily in and near Grand Rapids wearing a down jacket and toting a pack and shotgun. Fitness is her only concern. And at 5 feet 6 inches tall and 149 pounds, she said she’s about in the condition she wants to be.

Yet unlike the two European women finalists — one from Sweden, the other from Slovakia — Kouffeld has had only minimal corporate support. Vortex Optics has helped. The Grand Rapids shooting community is planning a fun shoot in July to kick in some money. But otherwise she’s depended on a gofundme.com effort to help cover her expenses. (To contribute, go to bit.ly/kouff.)

Winner of the competition will be announced at a Dallas Safari Club black tie dinner in January. A trophy is awarded. And the title of “Extreme Huntress.” But no money.

Students Build Off-Road Wheelchair


Baihly Warfield, WDIO
Updated: May 23, 2018 07:13 PM

NASHWAUK, Minn. - At 4 years old, Reed Reuter can find endless adventure in his own backyard.

He loves exploring his family's 10 acres of land with his dad. But unless he is carried, that's been hard to do.

Reed has Spinal Muscular Atrophy, so his body doesn't gain muscle, and he can't walk.


"SMA is a neurological disorder that affects the body's ability to gain muscle," Reed's mom, Brittany Reuter, explained.

Brittany noticed some things weren't progressing as they should when he was still a baby. He was eventually diagnosed with SMA when he was a year and four months.


"When he was diagnosed, the prognosis was that he would progressively get weaker every single day until he was completely atrophied," Brittany explained.


But Reed's body is responding well to a new drug, and the Reuter lifestyle helps with the rest.


"People always ask us, 'How's he so strong?'" Brittany said. "And it's because he doesn't sit still."

Reed likes to go full speed on his power wheelchair and in life. Now, he's got even more momentum, thanks to three engineering angels.


Brittany and Reed went and spoke to an Itasca Community College class about how engineering and technology keep Reed mobile. She also shared about some of the obstacles he still has.

"I thought the end of the project was just us informing the students as guest speakers," Brittany said, "but a few months later, I was contacted by the students, and they had been doing some behind-the-scenes work."

With their professor's permission, Braeden Lawrence, Axel Valeri and Zach Mans tossed out the traditional syllabus and tackled a real-life problem. Braeden said he could relate to Reed's enthusiasm for nature.


"He liked the outdoors," Braeden said. "He liked spending time with his dad outside and other things like that, so we wanted to help him out a little bit."

The three students built a tracks system that is changing Reed's life. His power chair sits on top, held down by four ratchet straps. The tracks plug right in to his wheelchair, so he can control it using the steering already on his chair.


The students 3D printed the plugs with resources at ICC. A few donated parts and some eager outside funding also helped make it possible.


"The college wouldn't fund the entire project, so they needed a little help with that. So they reached out to Kids Kare Fund, and we unanimously as a board approved the application within ... fifteen minutes," Jessie Belle with the Kids Kare Fund said.


Belle and Aubrie Hoover, the vice president, said it was an easy project to embrace.

"At their age, to be like really excited and gung ho is just amazing to see," Hoover said.

"I'm glad to see that it's actually getting used," Braeden said.


Reed also zooms around on a four-wheeler, but his muscle weakness makes him tired. The tracks mean he can play longer.


"This is huge. This opened a huge door for us," Brittany said.

It opened a door to their own backyard.

"See? You need to mow the lawn right there!" Reed shouted to his dad, Cory.

"Why?" Cory asked.

"Because, see all that big grass?" Reed said.


And he now has space for new discoveries, like a bird's nest in his yard and the ability to ride in the water at the beach.


As for what's next for the ICC students, all three of them graduated, and all three are headed for Michigan Tech to continue studying engineering.


You can follow Reed's story on his Facebook page.


Credits:

Baihly Warfield

Updated: May 23, 2018 07:13 PM
Created: May 23, 2018 05:46 PM

Copyright 2018 WDIO-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

Trap Shooting Now a Varsity Sport

MCAC Varsity Clay Target League to Debut in Fall, 2018

The Minnesota College Athletic Conference and the USA High School Clay Target League have partnered to pioneer the first varsity Clay Target League for two-year college athletic programs. The MCAC, comprised of over 20 colleges, includes campuses in Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin.

USA High School Clay Target League, based in Mendota Heights, Minnesota, is the nation's largest independent provider of high school clay target shooting sports with nearly 22,000 student athletes representing 804 high school teams in 20 states participating this spring. Minnesota has the highest participation in the League with almost 12,000 student athletes and more than 340 teams.

The fall of 2018 will represent the first varsity season of competition for ten programs in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference. The sponsoring MCAC schools (listed below) will compete in a six-week season, culminating in a season-ending event in Grand Rapids, Minnesota.

With the assistance of the USA High School Clay Target League, MCAC teams will compete each week within the league, with all teams competing at their 'home' shooting range and will have the scores tabulated virtually using USA Clay Target's 'True Team Scoring' system. Allowing teams to compete against each other without significant travel costs was a key factor in the ability to take the sport to the varsity level in only it's second year.